Be Smart to Attract Smart

A friend of mine, who recently moved his tech company to Portland from SF, is joining a group of other Tech execs for a meeting with the governor. He asked me what I suggest he discuss…what should the State be doing to improve the Tech eco-system in Oregon?

I’ve always believed that a good entrepreneurs don’t let the government get in their way. Like Gary V puts it “I’m completely of the notion the government can’t stop me.” But despite my libertarian business leanings, I think there are things the State of Oregon and the City of Portland should be doing. Oregon and Portland can leverage its strength – affordable, high quality of life – and encourage the continued influx of over-educated young people.

There is a burgeoning creative class in Portland, yet our economy is out pacing the talent pool. I don’t know of a single local tech company that isn’t wanting for additional talent. My own company SweetSpot hasn’t been without a slew of unfilled reqs for the last three years. Oregon State University, Portland State University and other Oregon programs are upping their game and turning out more qualified programmers, but that isn’t enough…we have to continue to import.

First, we could start a program to target the top several dozen Computer Science programs across the country. Any graduating student with a 3.0 or better should be provided a plane ticket to Portland, a couple nights at the Ace and an intro to half a dozen local tech companies. With Portland’s national reputation, there’d be no problem wooing some of the best and the brightest out for a few days of micro brews, fine food and interviews. State and local development agencies could fund this. A few hundred thousand dollars could see a very good return in the form of highly compensated new taxpayers.

Second, we need to advance policies to improve and encourage life for Tech companies. Oregon and Portland should embrace the digital re-invention of all our daily activities. Things that can continue to make Portland a great place to live, especially for highly educated young people. We should reverse the silly antiquated policies that restrict services like AirBnB, Uber, Lyft and other “sharing economy” apps. By embracing these innovative services, we not only improve our quality of life, but also encourage innovation and growth for local tech companies. It’s time our city leaders get their heads out of their…out of the sand…and figure out creative ways to encourage, not inhibit these new services.

Don’t treat new ride sharing services like antiquated taxi and traditional limousine services. Don’t treat AirBnB like traditional hotel services. Embrace and encourage digital reputation and dynamic application mechanisms to enforce quality and safety with regulations as a backstop. Embrace game dynamics that drive pricing and usage optimization decreasing congestion and waste.

With a few policy changes, Oregon and Portland could go from technical backwater that can’t even develop a functioning web site to the place every smart technical savvy person wants to live. We’re competing for talent with San Francisco, Boston, and New York, not to mention London and Berlin. It’s time we start acting like it.