The Portland Startup Tax – Lack of Local Capital

Last week I presented at Immix Law Group’s PowerUp Event on fund raising. It gave me the opportunity to discuss the Portland “startup tax” that local entrepreneurs pay when raising capital.

It’s no secret that raising capital in Portland is harder than in the Silicon Valley or even in Seattle. Portland has so little native investment capital. Check any credible source, like the NVCA Year Book, and you’ll see that Oregon has double digit millions under professional management. These numbers barely register on the same graph as Washington, which has single digit billions. You can’t even get Portland’s amounts to show up on a graph when compared to California’s nearly triple digit billions, even with a log scale; California has over 4 orders of magnitude more capital under management relative to Oregon.

This means Portland entrepreneurs have to raise money from elsewhere and pay a tax in the form of: time, valuation, and lower levels of support. Fund raising outside the area takes more effort than fund raising down the street. And because it’s harder to get investor attention, fewer investors result in lower valuations. This means Portland companies give away more company for less money.

Plus once they get VC money, Portland entrepreneurs receive less benefit than companies local to a venture group’s networks and support. CEOs outside Silicon Valley constantly bitch about VCs only investing in companies in easy driving distance. But this is a real practical consideration. Not only does it require less partner time, but support in the form of mentoring, introductions, and educational sessions are higher return with tight nit groups of local companies. Portland entrepreneurs get fewer opportunities for help at a higher cost than their Silicon Valley based sister companies in the same VC portfolios.

This part of the startup tax will never entirely go away. But it will get better as Portland’s many successes attract more capital at a lower cost, and Portland companies represent a higher density in VC portfolios.

I think the more interesting contributor to the startup tax is our own bad behavior. In my next blog posts I’ll discuss how we need to get out of our own way. Our own bad behavior, by both Portland entrepreneurs and investors, contribute significantly to the tax we pay.