Taking Stock

I left my operating position in SweetSpot Diabetes Care a few months ago making this a natural time for reflection. I’m struck by how the arc of SweetSpot mirrors that of the Portland tech scene. We sold the company to Dexcom, Inc. (NASDAQ: DXCM) just over a year ago.  Dexcom has continued to invest in Portland, signing a long term lease and tripling the SweetSpot staff.

This is a great outcome for SweetSpot; its employees, investors and shareholders. We were one of several tech companies to sell in 2012, a sign that the Portland tech ecosystem has reached another level of maturity. We now need to move to the next level – a plethora of growth companies, big exits, IPOs, easier access to capital and, most importantly, local venture capital.

I moved to Portland in late 2005, but it wasn’t until 2008 that I stopped joining the flock flying south for weekdays. In 2008, it was clear Portland had the potential for a great Tech startup environment. Most notably we had an enviable influx of over educated young people. Driven by the quality of life, Portland had a burgeoning creative class, increasing ethnic diversity and growth in multiple industry segments. Most of all, Portland was, and still is, the most affordable West Coast metro. But it hadn’t seen significant Tech success since Techtronics spun out the Silicon Forest companies.

Many of us were frustrated with how hard it was to get a Tech company started, let alone built to scale. Everyone seemed to have a side project and limitless enthusiasm. Un-conferences and Legion-of-Tech events filled the calendar, but real startups were rare and funding was non-existant. SweetSpot was Adam Greene’s side project in 2009. When I joined Adam, we converted to a C Corp. But, beyond friends and family, we had to go to the Bay Area for Seed funding. We pushed hard to change things in Portland.

We pressured then Mayor Sam Adams to make money available for startups, an effort that lead to the Portland Seed Fund. Wieden and Kennedy took advantage of the excess tech talent by starting The Portland Incubator Experiment (PIE).  This provided a catalyst for startups, accelerators, incubators, and angel funding.

We now have a dozen active accelerators and incubators. These, plus independent entrepreneurs, are minting scores of viable startups every year. SweetSpot was part of over $400m in tech exits in 2012, up from less than $100m only two years earlier. We sold SweetSpot because Dexcom was a perfect match for us. Partly though, we sold because of the difficulty in raising venture capital.

There has been over $200m in venture capital invested in a half dozen Portland growth companies that are achieving significant scale. Silicon Valley is the source of virtually all this money. These investors (including Foundry, First Round, True, Sequoia, Kleiner Perkins, among others) are confident they can make significant money in Portland.

Now we’re poised to take the ecosystem to the next level. Some of these growth companies will see big exits and perhaps an IPO. It’s getting easier to get venture money, but 503 still doesn’t even show up in the nations top 25 venture capital area codes. Portland is the poster child for the Series A crunch with more than a 100 startups chasing virtually nonexistant early stage VC. Portland Tech companies will create massive amounts of wealth in the next 10 years. It’s an opportunity which needs better access to capital and that should include local money.